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In the thread about the Durrant twins, a commenter scoffed that the racism found in America was distinct from that in Britain:

The BBC children’s show “In the Night Garden” and toy company Hasbro are in hot water over lightening the skin color of a toy doll.

Seems the doll for sale at toy stores was much lighter-skinned than the television character. Read more…

Huh…

Meanwhile, over at Black and Married with Kids, a blogger wonders if the much-discussed “mommy wars” exist within the black community.

But historically, haven’t black women always worked outside the home? Isn’t this a cultural thing? Isn’t this just what we (black women) do? Give our all in all areas of our lives?

Truthfully, I didn’t even know being a stay-at-home mom was an option. When I found out I was pregnant with my son, I told my boss and she asked if I was planning to come back to work after he was born. I looked at her with a confused look on my face. “Why wouldn’t I come back?” I thought to myself. Read more…

I’ve been noodling on a post about this myself. A lot of media outlets cover ad nauseum the (I think trumped up) idea of a bloody battle between stay-at-home moms and moms who work outside the home. (Salon, I’m looking at you.)  But most discussions seem very narrow in terms of race, class and even sexuality. I’m glad to see someone examining this issue outside of the context of upper- and upper-middle class white mothers. (An important group, just not the only group.)

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About Tami

Tami Winfrey Harris writes about race, feminism, politics and pop culture at the blog What Tami Said. Her work has also appeared online at The Guardian’s Comment is Free, Ms. Magazine blog, Newsweek, Change.org, Huffington Post and Racialicious. She is a graduate of the Iowa State University Greenlee School of Journalism. She is mom to two awesome stepkids and spends her spare time researching her family history and cultivating a righteous 'fro.
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